Quelleninformationen

Ancestry.com. Europa, Registrierung von Ausländern und deutschen Verfolgten, 1939-1947 [Datenbank online]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2019.
Ursprüngliche Daten: Arolsen Archives. Registration of Foreigners and German Persecutees by Public Institutions, Social Securities and Companies (1939-1947). Bad Arolsen, Germany. 2.1.1.1 American Zone; Bavaria Hesse; 2.1.1.2 American Zone: Bavaria, Wurttemberg-Baden, Bremen; 2.1.1.3 American Zone; Bavaria, Hesse (Children).

 Europa, Registrierung von Ausländern und deutschen Verfolgten, 1939-1947

Diese Sammlung führt Ausländer und deutsche Verfolgte zwischen 1939 und 1947 in Deutschland auf.

The Nazi persecution of both foreigners and German persecutees during the Second World War resulted in the forceable incarceration of these individuals throughout the German Reich and the territories occupied by Germany. Following the war, the Allies began a concentrated effort in both the occupied zones of Germany and Europe to document these individuals.

This collection consists of foreigners and German persecutees in Germany between 1939-1947 who were persecuted by public institutions, social securities and companies. The records may also include information on those who died, including burial information. The documents were assembled according to the Zones of Occupation - American, British, French and Soviet - by the Allied forces within Germany. Areas outside Germany were also recorded.

Information on what is included in each reference code can be found here.

Publication of these documents has been made possible through partnership with the Arolsen Archives (formerly the International Tracing Service, or ITS). The Arolsen Archives are an international center on Nazi persecution with the world's most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of National Socialism. Their collection has information on about 17.5 million people and belongs to the UNESCO's Memory of the World. It contains documents on the various victim groups targeted by the Nazi regime and is an important source of knowledge for society today.